Amanita mead

A forum for discussing the various ways this mushroom can be prepared.
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Kill_blind_elite
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Amanita mead

Post by Kill_blind_elite » Wed Apr 15, 2020 6:13 pm

Hey everyone, I'm thinking about making some mead. One mead with blue lotus, one with amanita, and two with amanita and blue lotus (nymphaea caerulea). I am interested in the synergistic results between the two. Blue lotus and alcohol go good together so it would make sense that BL would go good with amanita at lower doses.

The only problem that i have is, making mead the regular way that i learned makes too much alcohol for what i want. Mead makes upwards of 16 % alcohol by volume. I would like something less strong than a beer that i can cut, so here are the problems:
I was thinking of making an amanita fleece wine with the mycelia instead, but according to don teeter it should be cut 3-4 parts water afterwards. Calculating out how much blue lotus is going to be kinda hard and i will have to make it really bitter with that much BL to compensate for the cut. That would be 3-4 times as much BL as normal.
My other problem isi really wanted to use a fleece, but if i want mead, technically could i just mix it all together minus the yeast and boil it to sterilize it and then start a mycelia fleece on that afterwards? Or am i just going to have to brake down and use straight weight in amanita? I know that you guys probably don't make wine, i just have always been fascinated with wine making. I have made mead a few times, even BL wine to great effect. With just the blue lotus, more alcohol is better cause it completely pulls out all of the alkaloids from the plant like a solvent.

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Re: Amanita mead

Post by Kill_blind_elite » Tue Apr 21, 2020 6:43 am

So i had this epiphany a few minutes ago. I have been getting ready to make my mead wine as soon as i get all of the equipment and thought about the legends of mead, soma, haoma and their similarities.
According to the most popular theory behind mead is that honey had been left behind by bees in the rain and then it fermented inside of the beehive thanks to the water and the yeast that could have been carried by the bees into the hive.
Mead sounds alot like soma and haoma to me as in the fact that it was called a type of nectar of the gods and have amazing healing properties, let alone making one smarter and or immortal. This to me doesn't sound like plain alcohol at all and i think don teeter was onto something. A few minutes ago i started thinking about the psychoactive honey from the himalayan cliffs called mad honey,realizing that in one of the same poems about mead it also spoke of one of the people being drunk with wild honey. I started thinking about whether i could make mead with a little added on top to spice it up because of its (the cliff honey) amazing healing qualities.
I got this thought, what if the nectar of the gods, old world mead, soma, haoma, were all the same thing?
I was also wondering something about how much alcohol could be made from honey and amanita muscaria by itself in a mead preparation??? I started to see if anyone has used mushroom mycelium for wine production before and i found a study with the use of a mushroom by the name pleurotus ostreanus using it's mycelium for the fermenting process. I honestly think don teeter was onto something and maybe this just hadn't occured to him because he was obsessed with amanita and his terracotta bowl theory. According to the experiment that they conducted with that mushrooms mycelium, it has anti-cancer properties and a myriad of other healing properties due to the mycelium.
He (don teeter) knew of all the hymns that spoke of the flavor of honey and amber appearance, but did he never consider that it was actually made from honey?!?

Here is the url to the pdf format of the study carried out with mycelium to make wine....

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source= ... gboLASsMgB
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Re: Amanita mead

Post by amanitadreamer » Wed Apr 22, 2020 12:08 am

Kill_blind_elite wrote:
Tue Apr 21, 2020 6:43 am
So i had this epiphany a few minutes ago. I have been getting ready to make my mead wine as soon as i get all of the equipment and thought about the legends of mead, soma, haoma and their similarities.
According to the most popular theory behind mead is that honey had been left behind by bees in the rain and then it fermented inside of the beehive thanks to the water and the yeast that could have been carried by the bees into the hive.
Mead sounds alot like soma and haoma to me as in the fact that it was called a type of nectar of the gods and have amazing healing properties, let alone making one smarter and or immortal. This to me doesn't sound like plain alcohol at all and i think don teeter was onto something. A few minutes ago i started thinking about the psychoactive honey from the himalayan cliffs called mad honey,realizing that in one of the same poems about mead it also spoke of one of the people being drunk with wild honey. I started thinking about whether i could make mead with a little added on top to spice it up because of its (the cliff honey) amazing healing qualities.
I got this thought, what if the nectar of the gods, old world mead, soma, haoma, were all the same thing?
I was also wondering something about how much alcohol could be made from honey and amanita muscaria by itself in a mead preparation??? I started to see if anyone has used mushroom mycelium for wine production before and i found a study with the use of a mushroom by the name pleurotus ostreanus using it's mycelium for the fermenting process. I honestly think don teeter was onto something and maybe this just hadn't occured to him because he was obsessed with amanita and his terracotta bowl theory. According to the experiment that they conducted with that mushrooms mycelium, it has anti-cancer properties and a myriad of other healing properties due to the mycelium.
He (don teeter) knew of all the hymns that spoke of the flavor of honey and amber appearance, but did he never consider that it was actually made from honey?!?

Here is the url to the pdf format of the study carried out with mycelium to make wine....

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source= ... gboLASsMgB
Different discussion but my friend, the man on the mountain made amanita beer mead. I'm going to try it soon.
You make a solid hypothesis here about honey. Lots of good beer/mead made from it too. I would like to get into this when i get to the end of my long list of things I'm working on rn.
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Re: Amanita mead

Post by Donn » Wed Apr 22, 2020 8:56 pm

The Himalayan psychoactive honey has grayanotoxins from the rhododendrons the bees visit.

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Re: Amanita mead

Post by Kill_blind_elite » Wed Apr 29, 2020 9:36 am

Yea, mountain man??? I am also really interested in the health effects of the honey aside from the actual psychoactive effects. Apparently the older people in the tribe over there eat it alot to stay healthy.
Hopefully we get the stimulus check soon lol. Planning on getting 4 carboys, some airlocks and some honey. (HC mad) and regular.
There is one guy i talked with that said the honey makes him feel good all day long from one teaspoon. I was just planning on adding a dose per every two glasses of wine in a gallon. Since there are around 32 glasses in a gallon i was thinking about pitting 16 teaspoons in the final clarified wine.
The other blue lotus one will have good unprocessed raw honey in it and the amanita mead needs to be pasteurized and then decarbed, so no point in using unprocessed for that. Just a little unprocessed in the final rack.

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Re: Amanita mead

Post by Kill_blind_elite » Thu May 28, 2020 12:45 am

How come their are no preparation methods for ambrosia or anything like that? It would make this a hell of alot easier if there were other people that have made it to ask besides the guy that originally made it that is gone now. I am trying to figure out what to do about mine. I am using honey water (mead) instead of grape juice. i have the honey water pasteurized with some raisins for nutrients for the mycelium and i have it in a brewing carboy and have an airlock that i was going to put on it but i have grown mushrooms before and mold is a main concern that ruins batches. I didn't have any of that tyvek shipping material that don used, so i was thinking of using an airlock with water in it like with brewing and some breathable paper material on the outside that i will steam to sterilize before wrapping it around the airlock. I don't have sanitizer or isopropal alcohol for the airlock, do to shortage of those things with the pandemic. Wish someone had some ideas. I feel like I'm in new territory without any help.
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Re: Amanita mead

Post by Mcpato » Fri Jun 12, 2020 4:54 pm

Kill_blind_elite wrote:
Thu May 28, 2020 12:45 am
How come their are no preparation methods for ambrosia or anything like that? It would make this a hell of alot easier if there were other people that have made it to ask besides the guy that originally made it that is gone now. I am trying to figure out what to do about mine. I am using honey water (mead) instead of grape juice. i have the honey water pasteurized with some raisins for nutrients for the mycelium and i have it in a brewing carboy and have an airlock that i was going to put on it but i have grown mushrooms before and mold is a main concern that ruins batches. I didn't have any of that tyvek shipping material that don used, so i was thinking of using an airlock with water in it like with brewing and some breathable paper material on the outside that i will steam to sterilize before wrapping it around the airlock. I don't have sanitizer or isopropal alcohol for the airlock, do to shortage of those things with the pandemic. Wish someone had some ideas. I feel like I'm in new territory without any help.
We are pioneers my friend, I've only had moderate success when I've made ambrosia from fleece, mostly due to a lack of proper equipment but I've still tried many times. I just strongly suggest if you do, start using a small amount of previously grown fleece. The chances of contamination by other molds and yeast are much higher if using powdered amanita muscaria mushroom straight from the forest. That's just my experience at least. Teeter's method involved giving the fleece lots of breathing room in the carboy, looking for an ideal gas exchange. When oxygen is prioritized in the ambrosia the fleece grows fast and wooly, finally then turns black when it's completely done and gone to spore. The cool thing about fleece that Teeter may or may not have knows is that it can be grown under the surface of the ambrosia liquid in an oxygenless environment as well!
This anaerobic state of the fleece acts more as a yeast but doesn't produce alcohol, rather the amanita-like compound and co2. I think treating it more as a bioreactor rather than a wine is in order here, because while yeast is so fast and active, fleece in the anaerobic state is 2-3 times slower than when it can breath. The longer wait time is almost worth the wait, considering how often my aerobic ambrosia experiments have failed due to present oxygen loving contams.

Personally, my opinion is that the reason there aren't many preparation methods available is because of the very steep learning curve in getting the fleece to grow without any contamination. It took me so many attempts to even get 1 fleece experiment to work. How many people with only a passing interest tried once, twice, or 3 times at the most and then failed. Some of us are motivated, me for example, it took me about a year of weekly experiments before I had success. So roughly 40-50 tries before I got it!??? Doesn't sound far off, and I learned a ton in the process. Luck is a major factor too. I was probably just unlucky, because I've helped a couple people grow the fleece and they got it on their first try.

According to Teeter, Ambrosia mead works really well, it just takes longer, probably because of the more complex carbohydrate chains compared to say grape juice. Both work! Supposedly adding table sugar can help jump start the fleece. Also you may need to pasturize the mead before using it, as there are natural yeasts in honey that may overtake the fleece.

Wish you luck my friend!

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