Fleece cultivation

The Ambrosia Society was created by Don Teeter as a result of his research into Amanita Muscaria. They came to some very interesting conclusions although some of their work related to what they called 'the fleece' was later shown to be erroneous.
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Re: Fleece cultivation

Post by Mcpato » Mon Dec 09, 2019 6:05 am

T36 wrote:
Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:03 pm
3 or 4 days) i have stopped counting days for all of my batchs)))

Our mucor/fleece maybe an (endophyt)! (This is a very special and nearly unknown kind of organizms, that lives inside other organizms)
It grew on fried chicken :lol: soo yeah i think it will grow on cacao nibs or anything really :mrgreen:
That topic that i pm'd you is gold its a shame that no such topics where posted on the Ambrosia society or here(( very informative... so much info/posts are already lost! Links dead, forums deleted... :(
So that's what it's called, an endophyt? This has been my suspicion as well, how else could it be present and ready for resurrection on every specimen unless it is sharing space within the Amanita? This whole thing is so fascinating... and yes, I feel on one hand we are at a huge disadvantage without access to all that previously accumulated knowlege... on the other hand, we are able to think outside if the mold which led to the stagnation and eventual dormancy if the entire movement. Now we're discussing the fleece in new ways, using new methods of cultivation, and applying it in novel places, like within our bodies!! I don't know how you all feel, but within me at least, this has an all new momentum behind it. I feel urgency to perfect my methods, improve upon them... not rushed... just urgent momentum... I've never had anything in my life feel so important. You know, besides my family! They come first! Lol!
I already ate half of it raw!) And a weird thing happened! It tasted like piss!!! I recycled mine this morning) it was the second cycle)
Yesterday i drunk 12 powdered AM grams recycled it once and ate a piece of bread from my previous batch before going to sleep...
In that other topic people where mentioning that the fleece changes tastes of drinks and makes the urine taste better!?!
I dont know what to make of this all...
This is my experience as well! Next time before doing this urine imbibing experiment, try to avoid salt for a day or two and eat lots of fruit. Your pee will ALMOST taste... good? Idk. Both amanitas and the fleece make my urine more palatable at least... now... I've wondered but I'm kinda afraid of attempting this experiment for a few reasons... but might the fleece grow upon urine??? If so... imagine collecting psychoactive urine after eating a higher dose of Amanitas/fleece! Imagine how potent this would become. Also, sounds kinda "prima materia"-ish to me...... hmmm... Urine apparently is very nutrient dense... Lol I wish this is one I could do... I might have to think more on it...
Oh yeah and there is this Pastor dude from Germany!!! And from his trip reports and experimentations with the fleece it looks like its impossible to have a strong/breakthrough experience! Like you, everyone there seem to report a mild amanita high and no strong psychedelic visuals or head spaces(...
And it seems like wine is more active than the bread:/
Probably coz of the yeast and alcoholic chems combos...
So that sounds disappointing... but I don't think it's quite accurate. I have only had more mild trips with the fleece, so far this is true, but I have also had a severe lack of material to work with until more recently, but even now I'm still trying to make a large amount, which for various reasons has been difficult. I believe I'm close to having enough material for more daring doses. The other issue, is that the living bread eaten will always be less potent than a more pure liquid extraction, and this is just because of the foodmass. If you've ever had food in your stomach when trying to trip on amanitas you know having food in your tummy can really lessen your experience. This, I believe, is why fasting is so often recommended in conjuction with preparing for a trip, and why methods that bypass the digestive system require so much less material. My belief is that soaking the raw bread a couple times (and a few hours each) to harvest the actives would likely be similar in potency ambrosia, but the ambrosia takes several weeks vs the breads several days. The amount of active chemical we can produce using bread is vastly superior in my opinion, if done right. If I can multiply my bread collection quickly and cleanly enough I will experiment with these quantity based experiments.
Also just so you are aware, none of my most potent ambrosia experiments had, as far as I was able to tell, ANY alcohol present. Today I tried one of my small ambrosia experiments that hadn't developed any fleece on top, but apparently had grown some mycelieal strings under the juice, as well as a "something"/layer on top. I didn't think it was successful, yet I'm feeling it's effects right now to my surprise... pretty strong for just a couple tablespoons of juice!

Thank you for your input @Splinters and Shards, I haven't reached a "threshold" dose yet with the fleece which is why I don't believe I've had luck with the large quantity of water added. I can't wait to experience these higher doses, they sound beautiful!
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Re: Fleece cultivation

Post by Mcpato » Wed Dec 11, 2019 3:57 am

Shout out to @Wolf_Metal_Roots who sent me some samples of amanita pantherina today! I already have set up 2 inoculated barley experiments, and I'm REALLY hoping I will see some panther fleece in a few days! I've been looking forward to this chance for a long time! Wish me luck! Of course I'll post pics of the fleece if it shows!
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Update!

Post by Mcpato » Fri Dec 13, 2019 3:51 am

I have a few things to show you guys so let's get to it!
Image This is my pineapple-juice-anaerobic-fleece-growing-experiment! It has grown very slowly, but steadily! You can see almost everything in this photo, except the little bubbles, actually they're rather large bubbles...!
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See the size of those bubbles? They are acting like balloons, carrying the fleece all the way up to the top of the juice, and even through the oil! In every other yeast experiment I've made there are tons of teeny tiny effervescent type of bubbles. These bubbles form in the mycelium under the juice and get pretty large before I notice them. Most of the fleece is floating around at the bottom of the container.
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You can see the color contrast between the mycelium and the plain juice. There's a lot more mycelium in this than my other experiments, it's just all under the surface!

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This is my Thanksgiving stuffing fleece experiment. It is interesting... Most of it got infected with a a wild yeast and so I tossed it. These were what was left over. They are fairly thoroughly fleeced. They are extremely salty and umami tasting. Also it tasted very Iron-y, like blood. I didn't really enjoy taste testing it tbh... These would go best in some sort of food application. Spaghetti and Fleeceballs anyone?? Lol! It wouldn't even need much in the way of marinating. This has answered my question whether the fleece will grow on flesh foods. There is only turkey drippings In this, not Actually meat, but I've read elsewhere it does grow on meat. In my ethically-rationalized mind this fungus consumed flesh is the only way I would consider eating flesh, but even then I feel like I'm eating something extremely borderline. (I don't eat meat, and don't want to start, this experiment was solely curiosity.) I was able to harvest some good fleece for my next experiment though!
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I threw the stuffing grown fleece in this grapenuts'n barley just 2 night's ago! The barley was too wet so I added grapenuts cereal (as anotber experiment!!) To absorb the extra moisture! It seems to have worked really well! I think the fleece grows on ANY food, so probably even fruitloops would do the trick. Anyways, Live fleece is SO much faster!
ImageThis is my panther fleece experiment. It's just now becoming visible. You probably can't feel the level of excitement I'm feeling about this because I'm purposely trying not to sound like a crazy person. Oh too late? Lol!! I've been waiting for this moment since I first learned about the amanita's ability to "resurrect" fleece. I intend to work extensively with the pantherina fleece...
Image This is my 2nd Pantherina experiment. See the little white fluff in the upper right corner?? It has grown even better! I for certain have fleece here! I will need to closely examine these two fleece experiments and make certain it's actually a different strain of fleece and not my original muscaria fleece. Hopefully I'll be able to see the difference. I've read it grows a little shorter and might be a more off-white in color. We shall see! Ok, that's all for now! Thanks for being here with me on this exciting journey into new frontiers!!!
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Panther Fleece Experiment!

Post by Mcpato » Sun Dec 15, 2019 11:38 pm

Panther Fleece Experiment #1
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Panther Fleece Experiment #2
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Both of these panther experiments come from different sources of pantherina mushrooms, although I honestly do not remember which was which... but, they look, smell, and taste the same. These batches are VERY done. Maybe I should have processed them a day or 2 ago? Anyways I poured apple cider vinegar to the top of experiment #1, for an extraction. I cooked experiment #2 with lemon juice and water.
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After cooking it for 20 minutes, it thickened and became a much more uniform consistency. I strained it, and most of the mycelial mass and grain had broken down so there was very little remnants left to discard after straining. It reminds me of Kykeon, the ancient psychoactive barley drink of Oracle's, so I added mint and sugar to celebrate my disovery! Lol idk, I'll let you know how potent a brew I made. Drinking it now!
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This is muscaria fleece i grew from the growth on my stuffing fleece. It grew really well, and is much more done than I usually let it get. I pinched off some fleece on top to start another tiered growth experiement!
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You can see the spots I pinched fleece from on the sides. Doesn't it looks so soft and fleecy? Lol
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I'm attempting my tiered growth experiment again, because I haven't perfected my process yet. I think this method, if I can figure out airflow circulation better is the best method for producing larger amounts of fleece. On the bottom here I've put live panther mycelium in the middle of each of these three mounds of cooked barley and bulgur. (I haven't tried bulgur yet, so yay for experimentation!) The reason I shaped them into mounds is for the air channels towards the center of the plate. When I stack the mesh screens on top, good airflow has proven to be very difficult.
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It LOOKS like it will have more breathing room! Good luck my fleece hotel! On this screen and on top of those bits of plain 'ole muscaria fleece, I put 3 mounds just like on the bottom tier. I hope this works out the best yet! Until next time, good luck on your experiments!
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Panther fleece harvest!

Post by Mcpato » Thu Dec 19, 2019 11:01 pm

My panther fleece grew exceptionally well, and I was able to grab a lot of the "wooly" fibers!
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They really do look like wool though right? Crazy! I took this top pic yesterday.
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This bottom pic I took today, roughly 24 hours later. The mycelium is still alive no question! All the fibers grew together into a tight collective. What was once many is now one. Truly fascinating. I just wanted to share, i finally have my billions of panther fleece spores (once it dries at least)!
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Re: Fleece cultivation

Post by Mcpato » Mon Feb 17, 2020 6:34 am

In my experiments I've found good success cultivating the fleece on simple grapenuts cereal! This cereal has proven very easy compared to anything else I've tried! This method only works if you have already cultivated the fleece and have the spores. No cooking required! Grapenuts will soak up water and turn to a mush pretty quickly. I took a cup of dry cereal and poured in a 3/4 cup of hot water and mixed it up. In just a couple minutes it had absorbed the water and after waiting a few more minutes it had cooled enough not to kill our most desirable mold! Using a spoon I just placed small bits of the grapenuts mush on a freshly cleaned plate with just a tiny piece of my previous (living) batch of fleece! I tried to allow for air space between the spoonfuls so the fleece would grow easier. I've found that no matter what you use as a growing medium, the biggest success factor has been proper ventilation. If you don't have enough airspace for the fleece to live in it will quickly become too humid in its environment and it will stop growing and likely it will developed a bacterial or yeast contamination. So last week I attempted this and it grew very quickly as I had hoped. A couple days ago I decided to check it more thoroughly and discovered it was a little to humid in it's grow space, which tells me I used too much substrate for the mold (alternatively I could have provided more ventilation somehow). It had started to have a light common bacterial growth in the center of the substrate. I don't know what it is exactly but basically I know it by smell, and it tends to kill the mold and turn the infected parts to mush. I've tried eating the infected bits and it doesn't taste good, but it's otherwise harmless. So the other problem with the growth is that I had made the spoonfuls of grapenuts mush too big. They were about the size of small meatballs, and while they were fully colonized on the outside, I pulled one apart and found the inside still uncolonized mush. I decided to experiment further and break apart every "meatball" and place it back on the plate in such a way that all the uncolonized parts were touching some neighboring mold. ...i had washed my hands before handling but honestly the amazing thing about this mold is it typically outpaces most other contaminants, so I've found I don't need to worry about sterility when growing in grain like this (ambrosia needs much more attention towards sterility since it sits so much longer).

Today I checked on the final result and was extremely pleased! I actually much prefer this method to any other methods I've tried to cultivate in the past! The end result was a fully colonize living grapenuts meatball bread! I realized today that oatmeal would work equally well as long as you controlled moisture... and instant oatmeal should work just as well as the long-cooking variety!

So I don't yet own a dehydrator so I decided to boil my fleece and extract it into a tea! I cooked the Fleeceballs in water for a half hour, trying to stay in the 160°-190° F range. The last 15 minutes I added some lime juice to help any conversion into muscimol, then i poured off the liquid into a jar and replaced fresh tap water into the pan to again simmer, but for 1 hour this time, for a mostly full extraction!

I've noticed that pretty much no matter the substrate you use to grow the fleece, the tea will taste ALMOST identical. Also if you boil it instead of simmering, it will develop an almost metallic zing (knowlege from previous experience!) to it, but still be psychoactive...

The remaining twice boiled Fleeceballs still tasted pretty good so I decided to try using it as a plant-based-meat substitute like tempeh! I mean, it basically is a psychoactive tempeh so... but with the goodies removed in the tea, I decided to marinate them and oven roast them with veggies! It tasted wonderful and there is much further exploration we could go in this food direction! Good luck experimenting at the fringe my friends!!
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Re: Fleece cultivation

Post by thevoluntaryway » Tue Jul 14, 2020 1:15 am

Getting caught up on this thread has been fascinating - thank you to all who contributed, particularly Mcpato. btw I think you may have a cast-iron constitution and only hope that I do too because I'd like to try this myself. To those with less forgiving stomachs, I wanted to suggest that you try more typical fermented, living foods as a way to work up to these diy wildlings... Perhaps by starting with actual traditional style Tempeh, (strong!) blue cheeses, kimchi, kombucha, kefir - or even making your own traditional yogurt and there's this sticky fermented bean product that a lot of Japanese people like called natto... That list is giving me an appetite. ;)
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Re: Fleece cultivation

Post by Imme » Mon Sep 21, 2020 2:13 pm

I've made a grail! Honey water and a clay plant pot without a hole. I took a picture on day three of my fuzzy white friends emerging(today) tried to upload but my phones to slow! Yay! So excited.
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Re: Fleece cultivation

Post by Mcpato » Mon Sep 21, 2020 7:40 pm

Imme wrote:
Mon Sep 21, 2020 2:13 pm
I've made a grail! Honey water and a clay plant pot without a hole. I took a picture on day three of my fuzzy white friends emerging(today) tried to upload but my phones to slow! Yay! So excited.
That's wonderful! Where did you find a flowerpot without the hole in the bottom? I've never had success with the grail beyond the 2nd feeding. It has always developed a mold throughout. I should definitely try again! I would love to see your grail, even if its a lower resolution photo!
My understanding is the grail is fairly weak the first couple times, but by the 3rd or 4th feeding it gets pretty potent! Good luck, and thanks for sharing!
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Re: Fleece cultivation

Post by Druid z Podlesia » Tue Sep 22, 2020 4:59 am

Those black dots look like Aspergillus Niger, are you sure its psychoactive?

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