Creating conditions to encourage Amanita to bind with a host

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thevoluntaryway
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Creating conditions to encourage Amanita to bind with a host

Post by thevoluntaryway » Thu Oct 22, 2020 5:44 pm

I've only begun using agar for mushroom spore germination and have never tried sprouting pine seeds but...

I think I've seen posts from people that have germinated Amanita spores on agar so...

If pine seeds were sprouted on something clean, like kitchen paper soaked with pure water (or only the minimum additional nutrients) and then placed onto agar that has already been colonised by Amanita mycelia, I'd like to think that would create a better than fair chance of Amanita binding with that seedling. The mycelia and root interaction might even be visably detectable.
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Re: Creating conditions to encourage Amanita to bind with a host

Post by amanitadreamer » Thu Oct 22, 2020 6:11 pm

thevoluntaryway wrote:
Thu Oct 22, 2020 5:44 pm
I've only begun using agar for mushroom spore germination and have never tried sprouting pine seeds but...

I think I've seen posts from people that have germinated Amanita spores on agar so...

If pine seeds were sprouted on something clean, like kitchen paper soaked with pure water (or only the minimum additional nutrients) and then placed onto agar that has already been colonised by Amanita mycelia, I'd like to think that would create a better than fair chance of Amanita binding with that seedling. The mycelia and root interaction might even be visably detectable.
We know that only established trees at least 4 years old are needed because the mycellium needs the sugars that are made through photosynthesis. We know that they need a specific pH but also we have found bacteria needed in the soil. We know that they process information through the mycellium and that unlike fungi that just break down substances, the ones that are mycorhyzzal need to perform communication functions in order to process information on what is needed from them in order to grow. There's a reason young trees and then much older trees work with them but we don't know what those reasons are. We know these relationships are highly complex and we have only scratched the surface on this, enough to know that we know almost nothing except how complex it is.
There is also no scientific proof to support the growth of mycellium but rather, the mold that grows on some mushrooms.
I'm not saying that mycellium and seedlings don't form their bond at that very early stage and that they help each other and then fruiting happens at year 3 or 4. That's as a good a hypothesis as any. Just saying it's only one of literally hundreds of possibilities. Having said that, all we are doing here is shooting in the dark and seeing what we get. I hope you keep us posted on your process and progress and it makes me happy someone else is thinking about growth in the ground and trying to experiment with those relationships.
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Re: Creating conditions to encourage Amanita to bind with a host

Post by Rebis » Thu Nov 05, 2020 6:26 pm

thevoluntaryway wrote:
Thu Oct 22, 2020 5:44 pm
I've only begun using agar for mushroom spore germination and have never tried sprouting pine seeds but...

I think I've seen posts from people that have germinated Amanita spores on agar so...

If pine seeds were sprouted on something clean, like kitchen paper soaked with pure water (or only the minimum additional nutrients) and then placed onto agar that has already been colonised by Amanita mycelia, I'd like to think that would create a better than fair chance of Amanita binding with that seedling. The mycelia and root interaction might even be visably detectable.
Try it and see. If you don't experiment you will never know.

Good luck.
Rebis.

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Re: Creating conditions to encourage Amanita to bind with a host

Post by bigsalisr » Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:22 am

I thought that the amanita at one time did eat decay, but went extinct and came back getting its nourishment from the roots of coniferous trees and the trees let this happen because the amanita gives the trees oxygen, maybe. So wouldn’t root and mycelium need to merge and be almost or rather symbiotic?

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Re: Creating conditions to encourage Amanita to bind with a host

Post by bigsalisr » Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:24 am

This is intriguing!

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